top of page

The Advantages and Disadvantages of Different Types of Legacy and Bequest Planning



Legacy and bequest planning is the process of planning for the distribution of your assets after you die.


There are several different types of legacy and bequest planning to consider, each with its own advantages and disadvantages.

  1. Wills. A will is a legal document that outlines how you want your assets to be distributed after your death. One advantage of a will is that it allows you to have control over who receives your assets and in what proportions. It also allows you to name a guardian for your minor children. A disadvantage of a will is that it must go through probate, which can be a time-consuming and expensive process.

  2. Trusts. A trust is a legal arrangement in which a person (the trustor) transfers ownership of their assets to a trustee to manage for the benefit of the trustor's beneficiaries. One advantage of a trust is that it can bypass probate and allow for a faster distribution of assets. Trusts can also be used to manage assets for minor children or for individuals with special needs. However, trusts can be more expensive to set up and maintain than a will.

  3. Gifts. Making gifts of your assets while you are still alive can be a way to pass on your wealth to your loved ones. One advantage of giving gifts is that you get to see the enjoyment your gifts bring to the recipients. However, gifting can also have tax implications, and you may not have as much control over how the assets are used.

  4. Life insurance. Designating a beneficiary on a life insurance policy can be a way to pass on assets to your loved ones after your death. One advantage of life insurance is that the proceeds are typically paid out tax-free. However, life insurance can be expensive, and it's important to carefully consider the terms of the policy before purchasing it.

In summary, there are several different types of legacy and bequest planning to consider, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. It's important to carefully consider your options and seek the advice of a financial advisor or attorney before making any decisions.

bottom of page