top of page

How to decide if a DPSP is right for you and your business


A Deferred Profit Sharing Plan (DPSP) is a type of retirement savings plan that is offered by some employers.


It is similar to a traditional pension plan in that it provides employees with a source of income during retirement, but it is funded by contributions from the employer rather than the employee.


If you are a business owner considering offering a DPSP, there are several factors to consider in order to determine if it is right for you and your business.


One of the key considerations in deciding whether to offer a DPSP is the cost. Employer contributions to a DPSP are tax-deductible, but they can still be a significant expense.


It is important to carefully consider the cost of offering a DPSP, and to weigh it against the potential benefits to your employees and your business.


Another factor to consider is the level of employee interest. If your employees are not interested in participating in a DPSP, it may not be worth the investment.


It is important to gauge employee interest in a DPSP, and to consider offering other retirement savings options if there is not enough interest.


Additionally, it is important to consider the administrative burden of offering a DPSP. Unlike a traditional pension plan, which is typically managed by the employer, a DPSP is self-administered.


This means that the business owner or another designated individual will be responsible for managing the plan, including making contributions, investing the assets, and providing information to employees.


Finally, it is important to consider the potential tax advantages of offering a DPSP. As mentioned earlier, employer contributions to a DPSP are tax-deductible, which can provide a tax benefit to the business.


However, it is important to consult with a tax advisor to understand the specific tax implications of offering a DPSP.


Overall, offering a DPSP can be a valuable employee benefit, but it is important to carefully consider the cost, employee interest, administrative burden, and potential tax advantages in order to determine if it is right for you and your business.


Comments


bottom of page